For the past 58 years, the Robert “Tick” Cloherty – Western Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame has honored and inducted over 735 incredible men and women who have made a lasting impact in Pennsylvania through extraordinary athletic achievement and contributions. Whether these activities have been achieved on or off the field, we honor them here.

Harry Harvey

Year Inducted:1971

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Bas Bastien

Year Inducted:1971

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Don Hennon

Year Inducted:1971

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Wilbur Fats Henry

Year Inducted:1971

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Ralph Kiner

Year Inducted:1970

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Ralph Kiner (October 27, 1922 – February 6, 2014) was a big-league player (1946-1955) and broadcaster (1961-2013). An outfielder, Kiner played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1946-1953), Chicago Cubs, and Cleveland Indians. Following his retirement, Kiner served from 1956 through 1960 as general manager of the Pacific Coast League San Diego Padres. He also served as an announcer for the New York Mets from the team's inception in 1962 until the year before his death. Though injuries forced his retirement from active play after ten seasons, Kiner's tremendous slugging outpaced all of his National League contemporaries between the years 1946 and 1952. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975 with just over the necessary 75% on the 13th ballot. Many of Kiner's homers were hit into a shortened left-field and left-center-field porch at Forbes Field (originally built for Hank Greenberg and known in the press as "Greenberg Gardens"); the porch was retained for Kiner and redubbed "Kiner's Korner". Kiner would later use "Kiner's Korner" as the title of his post-game TV show on WOR-TV for the New York Mets. Kiner hit 369 home runs in his career. He was an All Star from 1948 through 1953. Greenberg tutored Kiner on the fine art of hitting home runs in the year they played together in 1947. Pirate left fielder Jim Russell was moved to center field in 1947 because, as Russell observed, both Kiner and Greenberg were “tanks’ in the outfield. Kiner was a fan favorite on some very bad Pirate teams in the early 1950s. Due to continued salary disputes with Pirate general manager Branch Rickey, Kiner was told, "We finished last with you, we can finish last without you." By 1953 Kiner, was in a Cubs uniform.

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John Michelosen

Year Inducted:1970

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John attended the University of Pittsburgh where he Started for three seasons, playing on Jock Sutherland’s national championship teams in 1936 and 1937. He was team captain in 1937.

After his college career he and Sutherland continued their relationship as a player and coach in the football Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Steelers until Sutherland’s death in 1948. Michelosen was the backfield coach on the 1946 and 1947 Pittsburgh Steelers coaching staff.

He served as the Steelers head coach from 1948 to 1951, compiling a record of 20-26-2. From 1955 to 1965 he was the head football coach at the University of Pittsburgh tallying a 56-49-7 record.

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Jushua "Josh" Gibson

Year Inducted:1970

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Jush was considered the best power hitter in his era of the Negro Leagues and perhaps even the majors. Born in Georgia, the family moved to Pittsburgh in 1923 rather than try to nurse a crop from their meager farm. His education ended in the ninth grade and his introduction to organized baseball came at the age of 16 when he joined the Gimbels A.C. and in 1929 was drawn away from Gimbels to join the Crawford Colored Giants a semi pro team. He became a professional by accident when Homestead Grays catcher Buck Ewing broke his hand. Jush was called out of the stands to finish the game. His legendary feats with the Grays have many experts saying he is the sports’ greatest home run hitter. The 6’1” 220- pound Gibson was nearly indestructible behind the plate. GIbson’s natural skills were immense and he owned a powerful arm. His hitting made Gibson the second highest paid player in black baseball behind Satchel Paige. In 1972, he was elected to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame

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Harry Greb

Year Inducted:1970

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“The Pittsburgh Windmill” as he is known in the trade was widely regarded by many boxing historians as one of the best pound- for-pound boxers of all time. He was the American heavyweight champion from 1922 to1923 and world middleweight champion from 1923 to 1926. He fought a record 298 times in his 13 year career. He fought against the best opposition the talent rich 1910s and 1920s could provide him, including light heavyweights and even heavyweights. Greb, had a very aggressive, fast moving style of fighting and would bury an opponent with a blizzard of punches. At the time of this writing, Greb was considered one of the best fighters of all time, 9th by BoxRec, and was named the 7thgreatest fighter of all time by Ring Magazine,

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Dr Henry Clifford "Doc" Carlson

Year Inducted:1969

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Doc is a Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame inductee. He was the men’s basketball coach of his alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh from 1922 – 1953. At Pitt, he compiled a record of 367-247 (.595). His 1927 team was 27-0 and was retroactively named the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation and the Premo-Porretta Power Roll. His 1929-30 team was Also name national Champion for the 1928-30 by the Helms Foundation. His 1941 squad made the 1941 Final Four.

As an athlete at Pitt, Carlson was an All-America end in football and lettered in basketball. At Pitt, Doc earned three letters in basketball, two in baseball and four in football.

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Jack Twyman

Year Inducted:1969

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After failing three times to make his team at Pittsburgh Central Catholic in the late 1940’s. He went on to be a star at the University of Cincinnati and averaged 19 points a game in an 11-year NBA career with the Rochester/Cincinnati Royals. He joined the Royals in 1956. Although not great friends, He became the legal guardian of teammate Maurice Stokes After stokes suffered a head injury in 1958 and was paralyzed the final final 12 years of his life.

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Edward J. "Eddie" McCluskey

Year Inducted:1969

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Bob Friend

Year Inducted:1969

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(November 24, 1930 – February 3, 2019) was a right-handed big-league pitcher between 1951 and 1966 (197-230), most notably as a member of the Pittsburgh Pirates. A four-time All-Star (1956,1958, 1960), Friend was an integral member of the Pirates team that defeated the New York Yankees in the 1960 World Series. Known as a workhorse pitcher who would go nine innings, he had 1,734 career strikeouts. With Vernon Law, especially in 1960, he was considered part of the best 1-2 combination in baseball. He played for the New York Yankees and New York Mets in his final season of 1966. As of 2019, he still held Pirates records for career innings pitched and strikeouts. He is the first man to lead the league in ERA while pitching for a last place team.

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Dick Groat

Year Inducted:1969

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One of the finest athletes of his time. Groat played shortstop for the Pirates for nine years (1952, 1955-62), sparking the team to a world championship in 1960 when he led the team in hitting with a .325 average and was named MVP. Groat posted a .286 over his 14-year major league career, batting ,300 or better four times. A graduate of Swissvale High School Dick was an All-American In Baseball and Basketball at Duke University.
A six foot Guard, he led the nation in scoring his senior season, averaging 26 points per game. He played one season in the NBA before making baseball his career.

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William McKechnie

Year Inducted:1968

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Bill was born in Wilkinsburg, PA in 1886.
He made his major league debut in 1907with the Pittsburgh Pirates, appearing in three games. He reemerged again in 1910 in a more substantial role substantially at third base. He played for the Pirates in 1907, 1910 to 1912, 1918 and 1920. Over this period, he also played for six other major league clubs.
In 846 games over 11 seasons he posted a .251 batting average; with 319 runs, 8 home runs and 240 RBIs. Following his playing days McKechnie managed for a year in the minors before taking over the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1922.
He managed the Pirates (1922-1926), St. Louis Cardinals (1928-1929), Boston Braves (1930-1937) and Cincinnati Reds (1938-1946). He compiled a record of 1,896 wins and 1,723 losses. His teams won four National League pennants (1925.’28.’39 and ’40).
He is the only National League Manager to win pennants with three teams (Pittsburgh, St Louis, and Cincinnati).

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Lloyd James “Little Poison” Waner

Year Inducted:1968

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Lloyd James Waner (March 16, 1906 – July 22, 1982) nicknamed “Little Poison,” was a big-league center fielder. His small stature at 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) and 132 pounds (68 kg) made him one of the smallest players of his era. Along with his brother, Paul Waner, he anchored the Pittsburgh Pirates outfield throughout the 1920s and 1930s. After brief stints with four other teams (Braves, Reds, Phillies, Dodgers) late in his career, Waner retired as a Pirate. Waner finished with a batting average over .300 in ten seasons. He earned a selection to the All-Star game in 1938. Lloyd with 2,459 hits and Paul Waner with 3,152 hits set the record for career hits by brothers in major league baseball. Lloyd was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1967. He worked as a scout for the Pirates and the Baltimore Orioles after retiring as a player.

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Dr Micheal Zernich

Year Inducted:1968

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Ferdinand Henry John "Fritzie" Zivic

Year Inducted:1968

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Ferdinand Henry John (Fritzie) Zivcich (Zivic) was an American boxer of Croatian descent who held the World Welterweight Championship from October 4, 1940 until July 29, 1941. As a young man, he followed the example of his four elder brothers who boxed and became known as the “Fighting Zivics”. He lost to Billy Conn, 1939 World Light-Heavyweight Champion, before 5,163 In a ten-round split decision at the Duquesne Gardens in Pittsburgh. In January 1939, Zivic defeated Jackie Burke, former Utah Intermountain and Pacific Southwest Welter-Weight title holder in 1939 and avenged a loss to former Junior Welterweight Champ Johnny Judick with a sixth round knockout. He defeated another Pittsburgh boxer, Sammy Angott in an elimination match to determine who would face Henry Armstrong for the World Welterweight Title noted above. Fritzie received a $3,200 Purse for his win, his biggest ever.

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Maurice Stokes

Year Inducted:1967

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Maurice gained fame as a phenomenal high school player at Pittsburgh’s Westinghouse, graduating in 1951. He achieved college stardom at St. Francis College, where he scored 2,282 points. The 6- foot- seven, 270 pound Stokes played three years in the NBA and was rookie of the year in 1956 with the Rochester Royals. His career was cut short by a head injury suffered in the last game of the 1958 season. The injury resulted in a form of sleeping sickness that left him paralyzed until his death at the age of 36 in 1970.

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Wilbur Cooper

Year Inducted:1967

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Wilbur Cooper (February 24, 1892 – August 7, 1973) was a big-league starting pitcher who played most of his career for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1912-24). A four-time winner of 20 games in the early 1920s, he was the first National League left-hander to win 200 games. In 1916 he set a team record, still unbroken, with a 1.87 earned run average. He won at least 17 games each year from 1917 through 1924, peaking with seasons of 24, 22 and 23 wins from 1920 to 1922, and led the league in starts and complete games twice each, and in wins, innings and shutouts once each. He worked quickly in his starts, often not getting the signal from his catcher until he had already begun his windup. He established NL records for left-handers – second only to Eddie Plank among all southpaws – for career wins (216), innings pitched (3466⅓) and games started (405); all were broken within several years by Eppa Rixey. His career earned run average of 2.89 is also the lowest of any left-hander with at least 3000 innings in the NL. He still holds the Pirates franchise records for career victories (202) and complete games (263); he also set club records, since broken, for innings (3,201), strikeouts (1,191), and games pitched (469). Cooper, who batted right-handed, was also a fine fielder and hitter. Fellow teammate Pie Traynor recalled that Cooper would often bat in the #8 slot when he was starting; in 1924, he batted .346 in 104 at bats. He had a career .239 average with 6 home runs and 106 RBI.

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Dr. John Bain "Jock" Sutherland

Year Inducted:1966

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A native of Coupar Angus in Scotland, Sutherland got his start in football by playing end at the University of Pittsburgh, commonly known as Pitt, under legendary coach Glenn Scobey "Pop" Warner. Sutherland was named an All-American and played on Pitt's national championship teams in 1915 and 1916.

Sutherland also played on Pitt's undefeated 1917 team. The 1917 team was known as "The Fighting Dentists" because on occasion every position was filled by dental students. Began his career as a Head Coach at Lafayette College and then going to the University of Pittsburgh where he coached his team to national prominence..

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