For the past 58 years, the Robert “Tick” Cloherty – Western Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame has honored and inducted over 735 incredible men and women who have made a lasting impact in Pennsylvania through extraordinary athletic achievement and contributions. Whether these activities have been achieved on or off the field, we honor them here.

Paul Sullivan

Year Inducted:1971

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Dick Linder

Year Inducted:1971

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Grover Washabaugh

Year Inducted:1971

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William "Bullet Bill" Dudley

Year Inducted:1971

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All-American at University of Virginia. All-Time Pittsburgh Steeler
Running back and was All-Pro for several years – Played with Detroit Lions and the Washington Redskins. Selected top pick in the 1942 NFL Draft by Steelers. Though small in stature, 5’10”, 182 pounds, he was leading rusher his rookie year with 696 yards earning him All-League honors.
Elected to the National Football League Hall of Fame in 1966. The book, Greatest 60 Minutes in Football, chronicles the man.

Zigmund "Red" Mihalik

Year Inducted:1971

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Graduated Ford City (PA) High School, 1935, where he played basketball and began his officiating career at the high school level. “Red” was named in 1951 as the’ ‘Best Referee in the United States.” He has had an illustrious career as a basketball official at all levels, amateur, collegiate, professional. He ranks among the leaders with six NCAA championship finals. His first collegiate assignments were in the ECAC and he worked 12 Dixie Classics, NIT, Big Ten, NAIA, ACC and the AU finals. Coaches have praised him for his’ ‘honesty, integrity and complete knowledge of the game.” Inductions include: Western Chapter of Pa. Hall of Fame, 1971. Pittsburgh Hall ofFame, 1979. Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., 1986. Indiana Tri County Association, 1986. Retired as an official in 1973 and still resides in Ford City.

Sonny Yakopec

Year Inducted:1971

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Satchel Page

Year Inducted:1971

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Teddy Yarosz

Year Inducted:1971

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Yarosz was born the second of eight children on the North side of Pittsburgh, He became a professional boxer in 1929. He would eventually be trained by the legendary Ray Arcel and managed by Ray Fouts.

On August 21, 1933, Yarosz won the Pennsylvania version of the world middleweight title from Vince Dundee in ten rounds before 15,000 at Pittsburgh's Forbes Field. Yarosz annoyed Dundee with frequent left jabs to the face and scored repeatedly with rights to the jaw. In the second, Yarosz had Dundee against the ropes for over a half minute, and scored with lefts and rights to both the head and face with little return. In the ninth, Dundee took a strong offensive stand, but was too exhausted to do much damage to Yarosz

Sam JR Parks

Year Inducted:1971

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Al Patnik

Year Inducted:1971

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Rex Perry

Year Inducted:1971

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Harry Harvey

Year Inducted:1971

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Bas Bastien

Year Inducted:1971

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Don Hennon

Year Inducted:1971

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Wilbur Fats Henry

Year Inducted:1971

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Ralph Kiner

Year Inducted:1970

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Ralph Kiner (October 27, 1922 – February 6, 2014) was a big-league player (1946-1955) and broadcaster (1961-2013). An outfielder, Kiner played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1946-1953), Chicago Cubs, and Cleveland Indians. Following his retirement, Kiner served from 1956 through 1960 as general manager of the Pacific Coast League San Diego Padres. He also served as an announcer for the New York Mets from the team's inception in 1962 until the year before his death. Though injuries forced his retirement from active play after ten seasons, Kiner's tremendous slugging outpaced all of his National League contemporaries between the years 1946 and 1952. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975 with just over the necessary 75% on the 13th ballot. Many of Kiner's homers were hit into a shortened left-field and left-center-field porch at Forbes Field (originally built for Hank Greenberg and known in the press as "Greenberg Gardens"); the porch was retained for Kiner and redubbed "Kiner's Korner". Kiner would later use "Kiner's Korner" as the title of his post-game TV show on WOR-TV for the New York Mets. Kiner hit 369 home runs in his career. He was an All Star from 1948 through 1953. Greenberg tutored Kiner on the fine art of hitting home runs in the year they played together in 1947. Pirate left fielder Jim Russell was moved to center field in 1947 because, as Russell observed, both Kiner and Greenberg were “tanks’ in the outfield. Kiner was a fan favorite on some very bad Pirate teams in the early 1950s. Due to continued salary disputes with Pirate general manager Branch Rickey, Kiner was told, "We finished last with you, we can finish last without you." By 1953 Kiner, was in a Cubs uniform.

John Michelosen

Year Inducted:1970

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Jushua "Josh" Gibson

Year Inducted:1970

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Jush was considered the best power hitter in his era of the Negro Leagues and perhaps even the majors. Born in Georgia, the family moved to Pittsburgh in 1923 rather than try to nurse a crop from their meager farm. His education ended in the ninth grade and his introduction to organized baseball came at the age of 16 when he joined the Gimbels A.C. and in 1929 was drawn away from Gimbels to join the Crawford Colored Giants a semi pro team. He became a professional by accident when Homestead Grays catcher Buck Ewing broke his hand. Jush was called out of the stands to finish the game. His legendary feats with the Grays have many experts saying he is the sports’ greatest home run hitter. The 6’1” 220- pound Gibson was nearly indestructible behind the plate. GIbson’s natural skills were immense and he owned a powerful arm. His hitting made Gibson the second highest paid player in black baseball behind Satchel Paige. In 1972, he was elected to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame

Harry Greb

Year Inducted:1970

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“The Pittsburgh Windmill” as he is known in the trade was widely regarded by many boxing historians as one of the best pound- for-pound boxers of all time. He was the American heavyweight champion from 1922 to1923 and world middleweight champion from 1923 to 1926. He fought a record 298 times in his 13 year career. He fought against the best opposition the talent rich 1910s and 1920s could provide him, including light heavyweights and even heavyweights. Greb, had a very aggressive, fast moving style of fighting and would bury an opponent with a blizzard of punches. At the time of this writing, Greb was considered one of the best fighters of all time, 9th by BoxRec, and was named the 7thgreatest fighter of all time by Ring Magazine,

Dr Henry Clifford "Doc" Carlson

Year Inducted:1969

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Third Photo - Center below Bio