For the past 58 years, the Robert “Tick” Cloherty – Western Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame has honored and inducted over 735 incredible men and women who have made a lasting impact in Pennsylvania through extraordinary athletic achievement and contributions. Whether these activities have been achieved on or off the field, we honor them here.

Ray Kemp

Year Inducted:1978

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Lefty Kendall

Year Inducted:1978

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Nickolas Skorich

Year Inducted:1978

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Nick was born in Bellaire, Ohio and was an outstanding lineman at BellaireHigh School and the University of Cincinnati before joining the Navy in 1943. After World War II he signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers, who had drafted him in 1943. With the Steelers, he wore #12 and lined up in the back field in the Steelers single- wing attack. When he retired, Nick remained in Pittsburgh and coached at Pittsburgh Central Catholic and worked construction. He returned to the NFL as a coach with the Steelers in 1954, the Packers in 1958 and the Eagles in 1959. He was named the Philadelphia Eagles Head Coach in 1961-1963, compiling a record of 15-24-3. He became an assistant coach with the Cleveland Browns in 1964 and was named Head Coach in 1971, compiling a record 0f 30-24-2 over four seasons. Upon leaving the sidelines, he took a position as Assistant Supervisor of Officials of Officials on PA Hall of Famer Art McNally’s staff at the NFL office in New York.

Art Strimel

Year Inducted:1978

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Roy Davis

Year Inducted:1978

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Moe Fassinger

Year Inducted:1978

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Dave Fawcett

Year Inducted:1978

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Willard Fisher

Year Inducted:1978

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Eutham Napier

Year Inducted:1978

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Jerry Nuzum

Year Inducted:1978

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Bucky Palermo

Year Inducted:1978

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Steve Petro

Year Inducted:1978

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Since leaving Johnstown High School, where he lettered for three years in football, this man has experienced a long athletic career. His claim to fame was his antics and his abilities on the gridiron where he was a member of the Pitt National Championship Teams of 1936 (8-1-1) and the 1937 team with a (9-1) record, as well as a member of the 1938 (8-2) squad. The 1936 team defeated Washington 21-0 in the 1937 Rose Bowl Game. As a three-year Panther, doubling as both a defensive and offensive guard, his teams had a combined record of 25-4-1.

Steve was chosen to play in the first Blue-Gray game in 1939. He played for two years in the N.F.L. for the Brooklyn Dodgers, coached by his former Pitt Coach, Dr. Jock Sutherland. The first year his salary was $150/ game; the second year was $200/ game. He served for four years in the Army during World War II and played football with the Army All-Stars. His team once played five games in fifteen days against five N.F.L. teams for the “Benefit of Army Relief Fund” (proceeds distributed to widows of Pearl Harbor.) Steve returned to Pitt as Assistant Football Coach and served in that capacity under six coaches. He is presently Assistant to Athletic Director. Because of his enthusiasm and loyalty, he is known to everyone as “MR. PITT.”

Robert "Bob" Purkey

Year Inducted:1978

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Bob Purkey (July 14, 1929 – March 16, 2008) was a right-handed pitcher known for his use of the knuckleball. From 1954 through 1966, Purkey played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Cincinnati Reds, and St. Louis Cardinals. He signed with his hometown Pirates before the 1948 season and reached the major leagues in 1954. But after four seasons in which he was used largely in relief, posting a combined record of 16-29, he was traded in December 1957 to the Cincinnati Reds for left-hander Don Gross.
In 1962 with a record of 23-5, Purkey led National League pitchers with an .821 winning percentage. His ERA of 2.81 ranked him third behind Sandy Koufax (2.54) and Bob Shaw (2.80). Purkey alternated between starting and relieving in 1965, finishing the year with a 10-9 mark, and the Cardinals sold his contract to the Pirates a few days before the 1966 season began. Purkey’s career ended that season with ten relief appearances for Pittsburgh before being released in August. Over a 13-season career, Purkey posted a 129-115 record with 793 strikeouts, an ERA of 3.79 in 386 appearances, including 276 starts, 92 complete games, 13 shutouts, 9 saves, and 2,1142⁄3 innings of work.
Purkey was an All-Star selection in 1958, 1961 and 1962. Following his baseball career, he worked as a sportscaster for KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh, then opened a successful insurance business. Purkey died at the age of 78 in his hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania following a battle with Alzheimer's disease.