For the past 58 years, the Robert “Tick” Cloherty – Western Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame has honored and inducted over 735 incredible men and women who have made a lasting impact in Pennsylvania through extraordinary athletic achievement and contributions. Whether these activities have been achieved on or off the field, we honor them here.

Maurice Rubenstein

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

John Henry Johnson

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

He player 13 years in the NFL - 6th leading rusher at the time with 6,803 yards. Scored 48 touchdowns. Played with Steelers 1960-65. Now resides in Pittsburgh. Voted High School Athlete. of the Twentieth Century in California last year.

Jack Butler

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Lettered 2 years and St. Bonaventure College and walked on with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Played Defensive back for 9 years (1951-59). He played in the All-Pro Game for 6 years and named All-Pro Defensive Back for 3 years. Jack holds the All-Time Steeler record for pass interceptions (52). A knee injury curtailed his playing career and he served as a Steeler Defensive Coach for 3 seasons. He spent the rest of his career in football as president and director of the Blesto IX Scouting Organization.

Peter Strasser

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Ernest Closser

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Leonard "Gus" DeAugustino

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

In high school, Gus was a "State Champion in 1949. He was a member of the U.S. Olympic team in 1952. In 1953 he was an NCAA Champion that was undefeated in college dual competition. After college he turned to coaching his beloved sport and began producing championship wrestlers and championship teams. His record included 22 Section Championships, seven WPIAL Championships, and six State Titles. He was a four time, WPIAL and two time PIAA Coach of the Year Honoree. He turned to college coaching and won the Eastern Regional Championship in 1994 and 1996 at Duquesne University. He has been the recipient of a National Wrestling Hall of Fame Lifetime Service Award.

Caleb "Socko" McCarey

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Walt Miller

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Elroy Face

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Second Photo - Left Column

Elroy Face was born on February 20, 1928 and was a big-league relief pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1955-1968). A pioneer of modern relief pitching, he was the archetype of what came to be known as the closer, and the National League's greatest reliever until the late 1960s, setting numerous league records during his career. Face was a six-time All Star. He used the “forkball,” one the rarest pitches in baseball. The forkball is known for its severe downward break as it approaches the plate. Because of the torque involved with snapping off a forkball, it can be one of the more taxing pitches to throw.

Face was the first major leaguer to save 20 games more than once, leading the league three times and finishing second three times. In 1959 he set the still-standing major league record for winning percentage (.947), and single-season wins in relief, with 18 wins against only one loss. He held the NL record for career games pitched (846) from 1967 until 1986, and the league record for career saves (193) from 1962 until 1982. Face still holds the NL record for career wins in relief (96), and he held the league mark for career innings pitched in relief (1,211⅓) until 1983.

On his retirement, he ranked third in major league history in pitching appearances, behind only Hoyt Wilhelm and Cy Young, and second in saves behind Wilhelm. Nicknamed "The Baron," because of his command performances, “Little Elroy,” 5’8,” holds the Pirates franchise records for career games (802) and saves (188). During his baseball career, Face, in keeping with a family tradition extending back two generations, worked as a carpenter during the off-season. Following his retirement, this became his full-time occupation, and beginning in 1979, Face served as the carpentry foreman at Mayview State Hospital until his retirement in 1990.

Jack Wiley

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Jack played tackle at Waynesburg College and appeared in the first televised game in U. S. history against Fordham at Randall’s Island, New York. He took a break from football, after graduation, to serve in the Army during World War II, rising to the rank of captain. He came home from the services to play football for the Pittsburgh Steelers and coaches Jock Sutherland and John Michelosen from 1946 to 1950.
He left the Steelers in 1951 to take the head coaching job at his alma mater Waynesburg College (now Waynesburg University). After a four-year record of 22-9-1 at Waynesburg he left to become an assistant at Pitt, where he is credited with his two star recruits Mike Ditka and Marty Schottenheimer. He left coaching in 1961 to take a sales position.

Emil Narick

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Joe Gasparella

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Johanna Gorman

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Charles "Chinky" Affif

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

Charley Zivic/Affif- A protégé of Fritzie Zivic, middleweight Charles Affif was of Syrian descent and took on the surname of his mentor after turning pro in 1944. His style also mirrored that of Fritzie and his aggressive approach coupled with endless endurance made him a popular attraction. Later in his career he would go back to using his real surname to honor both his family and his Syrian heritage. In the summer of 1947, Pittsburgh Press sportswriter Carl Hughes called him “the hottest fighter in Pittsburgh.”

Affif fought 59 bouts and defeated such men as Jackie Burke, Laverne Roach, Freddie Archer, Andy DePaul and Sammy Adragna. Some of the other well known fighters he faced include Tommy Yarosz, Lee Sala, Laurent Dauthuille, Joe Rindone, Pete Mead and Gene Hairston. He passed away in 1984.

Elmer Gross

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

William Amos

Year Inducted:1977

Photo

*

William (Bill) Amos of Washington was an outstanding fullback for Washington & Jefferson College football teams of the 1920s and received All-America mention in 1926 and 1927 when he served as captain of the Presidents. He is considered to be one of the best college football players in Washington & Jefferson College history. He had previously played on an Army team in World War I and at Kiski Prep School in Saltsburg. He also played in the East-West Shrine game for two years.

After graduation, he served as coach and head coach at W&J after his college coach Andy Kerr left to go to Colgate University.

Amos left W&J to become head football coach at Grove City College but returned to Washington in 1937 as head football and basketball coach at Washington High School. He gave up those duties several years later but remained as a teacher until his retirement in 1966 while serving as home and school visitor.

Amos was one of the founders of the Pony Baseball program in 1951 and served as national vice president and secretary in addition to being active for many years in all local youth baseball programs. He also served as director of the local Punt, Pass & Kick contest.

After retiring from teaching, he was public relations director for Pankopf Ford Inc. Amos has been active in numerous community projects and served 12 years on the Washington City Council and as director of accounts and finance.

He died in 1987 at the age of 88.