For the past 58 years, the Robert “Tick” Cloherty – Western Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame has honored and inducted over 735 incredible men and women who have made a lasting impact in Pennsylvania through extraordinary athletic achievement and contributions. Whether these activities have been achieved on or off the field, we honor them here.

Maurice Stokes

Year Inducted:1967

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Maurice gained fame as a phenomenal high school player at Pittsburgh’s Westinghouse, graduating in 1951. He achieved college stardom at St. Francis College, where he scored 2,282 points. The 6- foot- seven, 270 pound Stokes played three years in the NBA and was rookie of the year in 1956 with the Rochester Royals. His career was cut short by a head injury suffered in the last game of the 1958 season. The injury resulted in a form of sleeping sickness that left him paralyzed until his death at the age of 36 in 1970.

Wilbur Cooper

Year Inducted:1967

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Wilbur Cooper (February 24, 1892 – August 7, 1973) was a big-league starting pitcher who played most of his career for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1912-24). A four-time winner of 20 games in the early 1920s, he was the first National League left-hander to win 200 games. In 1916 he set a team record, still unbroken, with a 1.87 earned run average. He won at least 17 games each year from 1917 through 1924, peaking with seasons of 24, 22 and 23 wins from 1920 to 1922, and led the league in starts and complete games twice each, and in wins, innings and shutouts once each. He worked quickly in his starts, often not getting the signal from his catcher until he had already begun his windup. He established NL records for left-handers – second only to Eddie Plank among all southpaws – for career wins (216), innings pitched (3466⅓) and games started (405); all were broken within several years by Eppa Rixey. His career earned run average of 2.89 is also the lowest of any left-hander with at least 3000 innings in the NL. He still holds the Pirates franchise records for career victories (202) and complete games (263); he also set club records, since broken, for innings (3,201), strikeouts (1,191), and games pitched (469). Cooper, who batted right-handed, was also a fine fielder and hitter. Fellow teammate Pie Traynor recalled that Cooper would often bat in the #8 slot when he was starting; in 1924, he batted .346 in 104 at bats. He had a career .239 average with 6 home runs and 106 RBI.